Documentary Filmmaker Nicole Cimino reports on her documentary, The Paper House Report…

Posted in Film, Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2012 by thefrogge

I met Nicole Cimino in an acting class. She immediately stood out to me, well, because she is sort of brilliant. She is an extremely talented actress, she is brave, and most importantly she is honest. When I heard that Nicole had teamed up with a production company, Jack Boar Pictures, I was intrigued. I asked Nicole what she was working on with Jack Boar… She told me that together, they recently completed a documentary called The Paper House Report. I asked her how I could see it. She sent me the link… The Paper House Report.

Documentary Filmmaker Nicole Cimino

Documentary Filmmaker Nicole Cimino

I watched Nicole’s documentary [shot by director of photography Luigi Benvisto] and found out another thing about her… That she is an activist. I had no idea what the subject of her documentary was about but as I started watching it, I quickly found out that it is a cry, a plea, and a bold message to Save Jerry Delakas from losing the license to operate his newsstand on Astor Place that he has been operating for the past 25 years.

Jerry Delakas at his newsstand on Astor Place

Jerry Delakas at his newsstand on Astor Place

I wanted to know more about The Paper House Report and Jerry Delakas’ story, so I met up with Nicole and had the opportunity to ask her a few questions:

The Frogge: How did you hear about what is happening to Jerry Delakas?
Nicole Cimino: Last summer I was writing a one woman show about the Italian Actress Anna Magnani… I was waiting for my costume designer on the corner of Astor Place where Jerry Delakas’ newsstand is located. I walked up to the newsstand and realized there were many newspaper articles about him. There was also a petition to sign and a large picture of him which said “SAVE JERRY.” As soon as I started reading about Jerry’s story, I became touched and curious. I immediately wanted to know more about him, so I approached him, introduced myself, and asked him about the article clippings that I had just read… Jerry began to tell me a little bit about his story.

TF: What inspired you to go ahead and make this documentary?
NC: While I was talking to Jerry, I felt a deep connection to his story. I believe each one of us can relate to someone who is in the process of losing everything that he has worked so hard for all of his life. I felt so much empathy for Jerry… Maybe because he is an immigrant, just like me, who left his country and came to America to pursue a dream. But also because I could know that he is a good man, honest, and hardworking. Now that he has reached the age of 62 years old, it would be so difficult for him to start over again… But the truth is, Jerry should not have to start over again, after all, he is the one who has been running the newsstand for 25 years! The more Jerry spoke about his life, the more I kept wondering what I could do to take action and help him. After I said goodbye, I kept thinking about him all day… It was as if I knew him my entire life. Since I am an artist, I thought about ways that I could help Jerry- that is when I got the idea to team up with Jack Boar Pictures and director of photography Luigi Benvisto to make a documentary.

TF: Now that the documentary is finished, how do you plan on using it to help Jerry?
NC: As soon as I finished the documentary [produced by Jack Boar Pictures] I started to promote the documentary to let people know about Jerry’s story. I have done radio & TV interviews. I also had the opportunity to present a trailer last week at Trump World Tower. I created a blog called The Paper House from the first day I started to work on the documentary. I use the blog to share all the information I obtain. There is also a link where you can sign the petition to help Save Jerry’s newsstand. In addition, we are planning on submitting the documentary to film festivals. Lastly, we are organizing a press screening of the documentary where Jerry himself will be in attendance. Anyone who attends will be able to speak with Jerry Delakas personally, listen to his voice, and hear his story straight from his mouth. Hopefully, all of this will have an influence on the city’s decision regarding Jerry’s newsstand license. I also sent a copy of The Paper House Report to Mayor Bloomberg. If anyone would like a copy of the documentary, there are copies available for donation (as this is a non-profit project) at Jerry’s newsstand. If you stop by to pick one up, please remember to sign the petition! There are already thousands of people who are asking the city to grant Jerry a license. I know in my heart that Jerry should be granted a license to continue operating the newsstand. I know this is the right thing to do… I hope this documentary helps.

TF: Do you know what the status of Jerry’s newsstand is now?
NC: The Supreme Court of New York should have come out with the decision at the end of March, but they have not yet… We should be hearing the final decision in the next few weeks. Once the final decision is made, there will not be any chance to make an appeal. I am in touch with Jerry’s lawyer, Gil Santamarina, and he will let me know as soon as they decide. In the meantime, I keep going to see Jerry and to support him during this long waiting period. I really hope that the DCA and the Court will soon come to a decision that will grant Jerry the license he needs to keep on operating his newsstand.

TF: Is there anything we can do to help Jerry?
NC: If you haven’t done so yet, please sign the petition which you can find on http://www.savejerry.com. It would be even better if you find yourself by Jerry’s newsstand on Astor Place to sign the petition in person! You could also pick up a copy of the documentary. But, above all, if you could say a few supportive words to Jerry, that would be the best. I think encouraging Jerry in this moment is the best thing that we can do. He gets so happy when people go to see him and just say, “Hi, I am with you in this.” I am planning to have a party at Jerry’s Newsstand as soon as he gets the license he deserves and everyone is invited.

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Attention World: StyleLikeU’s First Book Comes Out Today! Hooray!

Posted in Fashion, Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2011 by thefrogge

Something great has already happened today! But what, you may ask? It’s not even noon! Well, I shall tell you… StyleLikeU‘s first book has been released into the universe! But why is this great, you may ask? Because the StyleLikeU book features 275 (that’s right, 275!) unique individuals who not only look incredible, but who are incredibly inspirational human beings.

StyleLikeU by Elisa Goodkind & Lily Mandelbaum. Available today, March 29th, 2011!

For those of you Froggers & Froggettes who live under a rock, StyleLikeU was started in 2008 by the sensational mother/daughter team Elisa Goodkind & Lily Mandelbaum. Tired of the mass marketing machine and a “fashion” industry driven solely by commerce… Elisa & Lily set out to take on a big and beautiful mission! To highlight the soulful connection one has with their clothing. They admit that when they first started, they didn’t really know what they were doing, but they knew it felt right. Entering the homes of complete strangers with just a video & still camera, Elisa & Lily began what has grown into an a wide-ranged archive of our culture as we know it.

The result is not only enthralling, but addicting. Never been to the website before? Watch one of the video interviews with any one of their electrifying Muses. Perhaps you want to check out artist Terence Koh, or stylist Lori Goldstein… Maybe you have a thing for Village Voice nightlife columnist, Michael Musto or RZA of the Wu Tang Clan? StyleLikeU gives you the chance to go inside each individuals closet to see not only what they wear, but more importantly, why they wear it. That is the beauty behind StyleLikeU… It is not so much about the clothes that the man (or woman!) wears, but who the man inside of clothes is!

Beatrix Ost & Ludwig Kuttner on Page 20 of the StyleLikeU book! (They are one of my favorites!)

I had the privilege of catching up with one of the authors, Ms. Lily Mandelbaum… We had a nice little chit-chat about her experiences of being a 21-year-old running a website, being a full-time student at NYU’s Gallatin School and putting together her first book published through powerHouse (Woah.) She told me all the stories that went into the making of the book, including the fact that she had to re-shoot roughly 60 of the Muses in just 3 months. It was the dead of summer, and Ms. Lily was running around NYC re-shooting about 3 Muses a day. I asked her what her favorite part of making the book was. She said connecting with all of the Muses… Going into all of their homes and listening to the amazing, intimate things they would share with her.

I asked her what her favorite part about the book is, she said the quotes! When powerHouse approached Elisa & Lily about making their first book, Lily immediately knew she wanted quotes in it. Here is one of my personal favorites…

“With fashion, there is a constant rediscovery and ability to evolve. You can take style through stages of your life, minimizing, expanding as you see fit. Some pieces become personified and imbued with meaning as they are worn and develop a narrative that ties to your personality; other pieces are fun, but fleeting. My most precious items are as much a part of me as my fingers and toes. They’re stuck to me, because they have to many memories attached to them, a certain kind of utility and magic,” Naomi Melati Bishop

Naomi’s beautiful jewelry

I will leave you with that my friends… As Naomi’s words are tough to follow, but I will say this… I may, just may be on page 24 of the book, and I couldn’t be more excited or proud.

 

The book is available at Barnes & Nobel, Urban Outfitters & of course, Amazon.com! Happy reading!

Love your friend,

The Frogge ❤


A L L T H E C O O L K I D S

Posted in Nightlife, Parties on February 16, 2011 by thefrogge

All the cool kids were at the Patricia Field‘s party this past Friday night, and by all the cool kids, I mean all the Trannys. But that’s a wondrous thing in the eyes of The Frogge, because sometimes (just sometimes) I feel like a Tranny myself. The Valentine’s Day Ball was held at Capitale, and 1600 crazy kids were expected to attend. Ticket prices were steep, at $100 bucks a pop, but the open Belvedere bar helped make you forget.

Patricia Field's Valentine's Day Ball hosted by Pat, Susanne & Kelly!

Walking in was exciting, and the air will filled with energy. As I checked my coat, I ran into the lovely Patrick McDonald who in very classic Patrick McDonald form was looking very Patrick McDonald. I happened to be feeling exhausted, as it had been a longgg NYFW Friday at Lincoln Center. Luckily, Illamasqua was there to help! A lovely makeup artist by the name of Jewrel came to my rescue. He made my lips redder than red and my eyelashes bat like a bat… After he applied some shimmery eye shadow, I was good to go.

On my way to the bar, I spotted two barely-dressed blond bombshells… Anna Evans and Arden Sirens, who looked ravishing in none other than Agent Provocateur. The Zand Collective was in full effect with Kayvon in a freshly constructed ensemble. It came as no surprise to me that he ended up winning the costume contest with a prize of $4,000! Woo!

Mr. Kayvon Zand. Photo borrowed from LastNightsParty.

Speaking of Kayvon, it seems as if everyone has Zand Fever these days, including Ms. Susanne Bartsch, who looked like a part of the Collective herself…

Click HERE to continue reading this post on The Downtown Diaries…

Love your friend,

The Frogge ❤

 

Black, Beautiful & Badass…

Posted in DJ's, Music, Nightlife, Parties with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 25, 2011 by thefrogge

When I first heard that Harley Davidson was throwing a launch party for their newest bike, it came as no surprise to me that they chose Don Hill’s as the venue… as they should have! However, nothing irritates me more than walking up to a joint that I frequent, aka live in, and have some dumb blondie ask me if I am on the list. I am not saying that I am The Queen of Sheba or anything, but it’s pretty insulting when you are in fact, a regular at a place and someone asks you if you are on the list. Who was she? Was she on the list? Was she even qualified to be handling the list? That would have never have happened if good ‘ol Thomas or James was at the door… But that’s what happens when Harley Davidson rents out Don Hill’s and decides they need something blonde with large boobies to guard the doorway.

HD Launch Party @ Don Hill’s

I was concerned that because of this “door situation” some of my special friends would not be inside. And although many of them were unfortunately shut out, due to the Fort Knox status, I was pleased to walk in and see my bubbly buddy Kelle Calco, the man behind Ladyland and Ruby Tuesdays. Of course, he was accompanied by his gal pal, the beautiful, the intelligent, the talented Ash Fox, rock & roll photographer and creator of Tit Tees, a handcrafted, rock & roll influenced T-shirt line based out of NYC.Ali Hassan, Wildstreet bassist was present, as well as the always jovial Mr. Marty E, drummer of The Dirty Pearls.Jonathan Murray, ex-bassist of BM Linx was also in the house, when I asked him why he left BM Linx, he said something about “not wanting to grow a beard.” Jonathan leaving BM Linx is old news, but I bring it up because that was something I was genuinely sad about… Their music was good, they were interesting to watch, and I wanted to see how far they were going to go…

Ash Fox & Kelle Calco

To continue reading this article on The Downtown Diaries, click HERE!

 


Walking Through the Mine Fields w/ NC Shuva of PUi

Posted in Fashion, Interviews, Music, NYC Bands with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2011 by thefrogge

Sitting down with NC Shuva of PUi, is somewhat similar to walking through a field of mines. For real. This is because when you are with NC, you never quite know what you are going to get. He alludes to somebody who has two conflicting personalities, somewhat similar to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. It almost sounds as if I am insulting Mr. Shuva, but what I just said about NC is something that he would most probably admit about himself. In fact, I am not insulting NC at all. He is one of the most interesting people I’ve ever met… And I wouldn’t be surprised if the whole world way feels the same way very, very soon.

I’ve been sitting on this interview for a while now, but the past two months have been incredibly exciting for the band. On Saturday, December 11th PUi sold out The Gramercy Theatre as they headlined Gotham Rocks presented by Live Nation. Friday, January 7th was their big west coast debut as they played The Troubadour, the famed rock n roll venue in Los Angeles. To top it off, they have been in the studio recording their new tracks (which are awesome.) It seems to me there is no better time to post this interview… Enjoy!

The Prince of PUi: NC Shuva

The Frogge: So here’s a question everyone is just dying to know… What in the world does PUi mean?

NC Shuva: It means Chinese-albino-midget!

TF: No it doesn’t…

NC: I can’t tell you what it means, but it’s the hardest question that people ask me…

TF: Why is it a secret?

NC: Because it shouldn’t matter to you what it means! It means something to me. What should matter to you is how the music sounds.

TF: Correct me if I am wrong, but I feel, music is all about sending messages, and sometimes before people actually hear the music itself, they hear the name of your band… So if they can’t understand what it means, what message is that sending?

NC: You’re right. The songs are about sending messages… The name of the band is completely selfish… It is a message, but an introverted message.

TF: Are you a selfish person?

NC: Horribly yes! Very, very selfish.

TF: Well, at least you can admit it. Are you doing anything to try to become a “better” person?

NC: Better? Hmm, I think I am just trying to become more selfish…

TF: Not really sure what I am supposed to say to that… Moving along… Who is PUi?

NC: PUi is a collection of very handsome gentleman trying to make fresh sounding, edgy, heavy, yet melodic, and at times, soft music… We are very eclectic. The members include, Leo Henry (vocals) Brain Hosey (bass) Ory Baum (drums) Tunc (percussion) and myself (guitar, vocals.)

TF: That sounds like a big feat! To be heavy, yet to be soft…

NC: English is my second language… I don’t know what that means…

TF: It means, that it sounds like a large goal to accomplish, in a good way.

NC: When you say you are an artist, you have to create something new… Because if you are doing what someone else has done 20 years ago, you are not an artist… You may be a “performer,” but you are not an artist. When you first see an artist, you should be scared. That’s what Elvis did, that’s what Madonna did. People didn’t know what to do with them, they didn’t understand them at first. I am not comparing myself to Elvis or Madonna because I am not that cocky, but they are my inspirations.

TF: Are you sure that you are not cocky?

NC: I am selfish, but believe it or not, I’m extremely honest with myself. I’m not cocky because I can always admit to my shortcomings. I am the first person to say that “I’m not good at this” or “I can be better at that.” I have to be that way because if I wasn’t, there would be no room for self-improvement.

TF: What do you think PUi does better than anyone else?

NC: That’s a hard question to answer. I think PUi does PUi better than anybody else. I can’t say that I’m the best guitarist, because I’m not. I can’t say that I’m the best singer, because I’m not. But I do think I’m a good performer. PUi does PUi…

TF: I could be wrong, but I feel you are influenced by System of a Down, Metallica, maybe even Tool

NC: In a very general, broad sense, yes. Those are bands that I personally like. When you like something, of course it is going to come into your own music. But, comparing PUi to System of  a Down or Metallica is very general. I guess if I absolutely had to compare us to someone, that would make a little bit of sense.

TF: Do you know what Keith Haring said about influences?

NC: No, what did he say?

TF: Keith Haring said, “I’d like to pretend that I’ve never seen anything, never read anything, never heard anything and then make something. Every time I make something I think about the people who are going to see it and every time I see something, I think about the person who made it.” I just think that idea is so interesting… It’s like, what would you, NC Shuva, make if you never heard music before?

NC: You know it’s interesting, I went to art school, and I heard many ideas similar to that the whole time I was there… I actually had to write an essay about this once. Is influence stealing or is it influence just a reference point? I think you need a reference point at some point in time, or your art may be too experimental. That’s the thing with having influences, it’s things that people have early on and you take them… Because if you look too far out, which I’m not the judge of what that is, if you don’t care about selling your albums, if you don’t care about money… Go on your own journey! Go all out! Don’t have a chorus to the song, don’t have a verse, make the song 20 minutes long… Those are all interesting thoughts, but it isn’t the reality.

TF: So are you saying that you care about “money” and “selling?”

NC: No. I don’t care about money.

TF: Really? So what do you care about? What is the goal? If you are not interested in money… are you interested in fame?

NC: I am interested in satisfaction. Because, money, what is money? Money is just paper.

TF: I agree that money is just paper… But I am not talking about the money itself… I am talking about what money can do for you… For example, let’s say you really wanted to go to Thailand… Money can take you there…

NC: I am happy here, doing what I am doing.

TF: That is beautiful. Speaking of “beautiful” I think one of the reasons that I enjoy watching PUi so much, is you are a really great visual band… Tell me about your visual style…

NC: It’s hard for people to believe when I say, and I really mean this, that I am not cocky. I just think confidence is the only way that you could do anything! Even if I fail at something, I want to fail with confidence. If I do fail, I am the first person to turn around and say, “Man, we fucked up,” but let’s try that again! It may look like I care about things that money can buy or that I’m a shallow person, but most of the things I buy are $10 or $20… unless it was a gift from someone or from a very special occasion. I guess I know how to make cheap things look expensive to other people, but they are always very cheap. I love making clothes by just wrapping a piece of cloth around my body.

TF: I did not know that you made your own clothes. Is this something that you learned in art school?

NC: I’ve always had a very visual mind that goes along with the music. Most of the time, I just get these ideas. We have a band stylist, her name is Angella, and she is a lot more talented with making things, so she makes a lot of our clothes. Conceptually, I come up with a lot of the ideas, about the clothes. I know how I want to look… For me, the visuals go hand-in-hand with the music.

(SIDE NOTE: For a closer, more intimate view on NC’s unique personal style, check out his interview on StyleLikeU.com! For those of you who are not familiar with StyleLikeU, they are an online style site dedicated to finding extraordinary & inspiring individuals who tell the story of who they are through the clothing they choose to wear. They recently featured NC and you can catch that HERE!)

NC Shuva of PUi says he's a man who isn't afraid to wear a skirt & F you if you have a problem with it! Photo taken from StyleLikeU.com

TF: So, let’s talk about the music… How do you start writing?

NC: I usually come in with an idea, or a concept, and then Leo will come up with the vocals, then Ory will come up with a beat. So, it starts out with me bringing in something and then together we develop the idea further.

TF: Do you consider ‘For the Gods’ PUi’s single? Ps… it’s my favorite PUi song… And also the new one Maara!

NC: I think ‘For the Gods’ represents us very well because we’re the type of band that has range. We can be angry, but at the same time we’re soft. At times it’s very violent and primal, so it feels basic, but then there are parts that break-in that are more complex.

TF: Do you consider yourself a musician, a performer or both?

NC: I think it goes hand-in-hand. I am a performer, but I am also a musician, I’ve had a guitar in my hands since I was three years old.

TF: Who gave you a guitar when you were three?

NC: My father, who is also a singer in Turkey.

TF: Is your mother an artist as well?

NC: Actually, both of my parents are doctors but my father is a classically trained Turkish singer who happens to be pretty famous. We recently had an honorary concert in his name and the president of Turkey gave him an award. Of course my father’s music is a lot different from what I do…

TF: It seems to me that PUi has a really good support system. I don’t want to use the word “fans” because it seems like the people who support you are more than just fans… But more of a core group of individuals who come together and really get what you are doing… It’s pretty exciting…

NC: I never liked the word “fans” either  because it’s really the people who make the history…

TF: PUi has moved people to the point that quite a few individuals have tattooed the bands symbol, the Crescent, on their body…

NC: Yes, we actually had to tell a few people not to get the Crescent tattooed on themselves! Of course, I want everybody to listen to our music, but if I don’t see you as my family member, I would rather be honest with you and say please don’t get that!

NC's Crescent Tat! Large & In Charge!

TF: So why did you choose the Crescent?

NC: It’s a very nice story actually, and it’s quite meaningful! It goes back to the moon. The moon is very primal, before there was anything people gauged everything by the moon. Batman used the bat symbol because he is afraid of bats. So, if I use the Crescent, I can conquer my own fears. For example, in Nazi Germany, they used pink triangles to label homosexuals, so, what did the gay community do? Instead of being held down by that label, they adopted the color pink as their own. If somebody tries to push you down with a symbol, the best way to not be afraid of it is to adopt is as your own. Now, I am not religious at all, and I do not support religion, in fact, I do not support any form of fanatical nationalism (basically, anything authority based, any organization, I do not support) because at this point, everything is meaningless, it’s like Coca-Cola. There’s no difference. So, I took a symbol, a symbol that labeled me as I was growing up [in Turkey] and I gave the symbol the exact opposite meaning. I have freed myself.

TF: That was beautiful, so I think we should end with that… But, is there anything else that you would like to say to me or tell me??

NC: If I wrote you a symphony, just to say how much you mean to me, what would you do?

TF: Hmmm, probably melt.

People of the Moon! Unite March 18th @ The Highline Ballroom!

P E O P L E   O F   T H E   M O O N !

U N I T E !

March 18th @ Highline Ballroom

 

Love your friend,

The Frogge ❤

PS… Tweet at me HERE! No Twitter follower gets left behind 🙂

 

 

Celebrating Gina Sachi Cody

Posted in Art with tags , , on December 19, 2010 by thefrogge

 

Please join The Cody Family at “A Picture Speaks 1,000 Words” in celebrating Gina Sachi Cody’s memory at the Opening of her first Photography Gallery, on what would have been her 25th birthday. All proceeds to benefit the National Aphasia Association.


When: Tuesday, December 28th from 6:00 – 9:oo PM

Where: The Xchange: 640 West 28th Street 9th Floor

 

If anybody has any further questions or would like to speak/perform in honor of Gina, please email me directly at TheFrogge@gmail.com and I will connect you to Gina’s sister who has organized this event.

S e e   y o u   t h e r e .

 

Love your friend,

The Frogge ♥

Having a Laugh w/ DJ Louie XIV!

Posted in DJ's, Interviews, Music, Nightlife, Parties with tags , , , , , , , , on November 26, 2010 by thefrogge

The thing that interests me most about DJ Louie XIV, probably even more than his music, is his sense of humor. If you ever have the chance to sit down with him, I highly recommend it as he is nothing short of hysterical. During this interview he had me cracking up to the point where I had to ask him, “Why are you pursuing a career as a DJ and not as a stand up comedian?” Actually, as it turns out, Louie XIV is a trained actor and spent many an hour at the Black Nexxus Studio studying with famed Susan Batson. He said after a while he knew it had to be one or the other. Unlike many other “DJ’s” that called themselves “DJ’s” in NYC, Louie XIV actually treats DJing like the craft that it is (Thank god someone around here does!) He knew that in order to be one of the best, he would have to give it his undivided attention. When he realized that he had more of an innate connection to music than to the theatre, his journey as a DJ began, and he tells us all about it in the interview below… Enjoy!

DJ Louie XIV

The Frogge: I’m here with DJ Louie XIV and we are going to jump right into this interview because tomorrow is Thanksgiving and I gotta get home and cook a Tofurkey! What is your favorite venue that you have DJed at so far?

DJ Louie XIV: I would say that I like The Eldridge a lot. I used to really like Baddies. I’ve spent a lot of time there. I used to DJ there on Saturday nights. I liked Baddies because it was so small; you could establish a high level of intimacy with the crowd. I just think there is something really great about being packed into a small room when you are dancing. But, if you are doing an event, there is nothing worse than being packed into a tight room! I recently DJed an event at the new Gansevoort Hotel on Park Avenue, on the roof deck, and it was so beautiful, the panoramic views were incredible.

TF: Is there a venue that you haven’t DJed at yet, but for some reason, you feel really connected to it, and you would like to DJ there soon?

LXIV: Everywhere that I haven’t DJed at yet is somewhere that I am interested in spinning! Every venue comes with its own set of challenges. I would definitely like to spin at The Boom Boom Room, I think that would be really fun.

TF: Is that because you are into panoramic views?

LXIV: Yes… Also, I would love to spin at a really big, multilevel club that holds like 20,000 people in Ibiza or in Tokyo.

TF: Interesting that you say that, because the rooms in NYC are so small. With that said, I feel like the size restrictions of the clubs in NYC allow every club to be very “specific.” This club is for “rockers” that club is for “hip hop” that club is “gay” this club is “Euro,” and the list goes on. Because the clubs are small, in reality, they don’t need very many people to pack them out. I feel like this system is pretty much segregating people, what do you think?

LXIV: Well, I wouldn’t say it’s “segregating” groups of people, but I would say I actually kind of like that. Any time a club is trying to establish an identity outside of the individual parties that they host nightly, weekly, monthly, I think it’s a positive. I think one of the downfalls of nightlife in this moment in time is that most of the clubs are invested in these nightly, weekly, monthly parties. They let whoever is “running the party” that night dictate the vibe of the club. In my opinion, this doesn’t create an environment where you’re going to the club because you like the club… It’s more like, “Oh, well my friend is hosting this party on this day so I guess I’ll go there.”

TF: That is definitely true because people will say to me all the time, “You go out, and you know what’s going on, so where should I go?” And at this point in my life, sometimes, I really don’t know what to say to them. It’s because, lately, I haven’t felt very connected to any one place. Actually that’s not true… I do really enjoy Don Hill’s, I think they have something going on there, it feels right, and St. Jerome’s has practically become a second home to my friends & I… but that is because I’m a Rock N’ Roll girl… But aside from that, there are no places that I feel I need to be. If you asked me this question 4 years ago, I would have definitely told you to go to Snitch. I’ll never be over Snitch, it was my favorite place in the world. It was like, no matter what day it was, no matter what time it was, when you walked into Snitch, you always knew what you were going to get. I felt extremely connected to Snitch, I also felt very connected to Collective Hardware… But nowadays, you mostly feel a connection to “your friend” who is throwing the party, or to the DJ… but not necessarily the venue itself. Okay, let’s talk about your set right now, what’s your thing, how do you describe your style?

Check out Louie's Website: http://louiexiv.com/

LXIV: I like to play what’s fun. I know that’s a lame answer, but at the end of the day I like pleasing crowds. I am a performer at heart. But just because I like to please crowds, does not mean I will play anything! I am not a whore. I have very specific tastes, but by the same token, I am not an elitist in any way. If I like it, I will play it, whether is pop-sugar or dead serious Radio Head, to show tunes, Diana Ross, Rihanna, disco, new disco, or hip-hop. My roots are really in hip-hop. That’s what I started DJing, I love hip-hop, and I am the most comfortable playing hip-hop. I could literally stand at turntables for days and weeks and never get bored, never play the same song twice, I just know hip-hop like that. I know the styles, I know the beats, I know the history. When I put a set together, I consider a lot of things; how do these two songs go together? Do they have similar sounds, beats? Do you dance the same way to them? I think about the history, I think about how two songs go together in a cerebral sense. For example, I love playing Disturbia, Bad Romance and Sweet Dreams together. If there was no Sweet Dreams, there would be no Disturbia and there certainly would be no Bad Romance. You can hear the influences with in these songs… Putting these things together not only for the crowd, but for myself is very gratifying.

TF: It’s almost as if you are putting together pieces of a puzzle…

LXIV: It’s like I am weaving a tapestry. I think a crowd can always tell when a DJ is thoughtful compared to when a DJ is just kind up standing up there playing songs with the same BPM rate…

TF: When you aren’t DJing, what are you favorite spots? Where could The Frogge find you in your spare time?

LXIV: Believe it or not, I’m really not a club person. I don’t like going out that much. I’m kind of a homebody. When I am up in the DJ booth, I watch what is going on as if it were National Geographic. It’s really been an experience for me, especially once everyone is wasted and the mating rituals start to take place… Sometimes it’s almost as if I can’t believe what I am seeing… Of course, I completely understand the appeal of the clubs. After all, I do work in this industry. Sometimes I tell myself that I should go out more, because most of the time when I do, I meet someone I like, or something good happens, but after I’m out for like a half hour, I’m pretty ready to go home.

TF: We are complete opposites… I could go out all night, every night… The thing that I like most about clubs though is they are an environment where it is conducive to let out your inner desires. And, as I am sure you know, it is the DJ who is mostly responsible for that. Because the bottom line is, if the music was bad, everyone would leave and nothing would happen. How do you feel about the fact that as the DJ you have the power to completely influence people’s moods and practically cast them under your spell?

LXIV: I adore that! That is why I do what I do, or at least, a very large part of why I do what I do. Any artist, if they are really honest with themselves, is looking to influence and effect people that way.

TF: If you are making art and not affecting anybody than you probably aren’t making very good art…

LXIV: The great thing about DJing is, every time you do it, you are doing in live. It’s not something that you do alone in your room and then bring it out to show everyone. Being a DJ is about live performance and it’s a real thrill. When you have been spinning for 45 hours and you have built up and built up to the climax of the night where every single person in that club puts their hands in the air, it’s really the most gratifying thing. Because you did what you came to do, and it’s really happening in that moment… I’ve cried before in the DJ booth!

TF: Your music is so danceable… And I know that is a funny thing to say, because it seems so obvious, but sometimes I feel that certain DJ’s don’t play music which enables the crowd to dance… I don’t know what they are doing… But it’s really frustrating… Do you know what I mean by that?

LXIV: Yes! They are playing music for themselves. Or, they are trying to act “cool” by showing off “how much music they know.” When I first started DJing, I also had a desire to play obscure music to show “how much music I knew” but I’ve learned to temper that with what actually works. I am very sensitive and I know what works, and what doesn’t.

TF: Okay darling, here is your chance, tell the beautiful people where and when you are spinning next…

LXIV: This Saturday night, the 27th at The Eldridge (247 Eldridge Street.) The party is called BADDITUDE and it starts at 11 pm…

TF: If I come and request a song, will you play it for me?

LXIV: If I like it…

Get your BADDITUDE on! 11/27 @ The Eldridge! Music by DJ Louie XIV w/ guest host Dani Baum.

So there you have it people! The answer to all your problems… You ate wayyy too much turkey and mash… You feel fat, and you are wondering how you can work off all of those extra calories? Clearly, there is no better way to do it than to go get your BADDITUDE on…

Love your friend who has a major BADDITUDE,

The Frogge ❤